More fuchsias today

I wrote an article on hardy fuchsias for Westsound Home and Garden a few months ago and  during my research, I got really hooked on these plants. I always like to grow a few plants before I write because I like the first hand experience.    Before I moved west, I was only familiar with the annual types of fuchsias. How limiting was that! Here are a few more in bloom today.

Unwelcome visitor

This year I planted about 24 bean seeds three times. The first time the soil was too cold and they did not germinate. I think the same thing happened the second time. I have a tendency to rush the season, beans are cheap and I only plant 24 since I am feeding two people now. The third time, around the very end of May, they actually germinated and grew and I harvested them twice, but then Sunday night my husband forgot to close the gate and I did not check and overnight the open gate welcomed a deer into my garden. Deer love beans. It/they snacked on a few roses but totally took out the beans.

image

Would you wait three years for a bloom?

Going back to my theme of “this wouldn’t grow in Minnesota” I planted some things in my western Washington garden that I could not get to grow in my Minnesota garden. David Austin roses lover the maritime climate here without any winter protection. Perennial herbs are such a treat. But the star of the day is this Monrovia yucca plant. It’s a first for me. I think I have been waiting three years for this yucca to bloom. Worth the wait, don’t you think?

Greenhouse bed between crops

I just finished the best crop of broccoli since I have been gardening in this location! (I am almost sick of eating broccoli. Or at least I am ready for a break from brassicas.) January 14 I started Apollo broccoli and February 20 I started Broccoli blend from Terretorial Seeds. I use a heat mat and lights at that time of year. Today I picked the last side buds and removed the plants. Now I am wondering what to add to this bed to get it ready for the next crop of broccoli for fall and winter. Any opinions out there? 

Too hot for transplants

I am trying something new for me since this is my third try with cucumber seedlings this year. I planted them out in the early evening then I covered the area with Remay fabric for sun shade, not frost protection. This raised bed is intensively planted with warm season crops such as tomatoes and a few bush beans. I draped the fabric over tomato cages to allow for air circulation. I hope this will give the transplanted cucumbers a better chance at success tomorrow during the expected sunny weather.