Last wildflower stop- Mt. St. Helens

The third day in the mountains took us through the Gifford Pinchot National Forest to the East side view of Mt. St. Helens. When the mountain blew in 1980 the devastation surrounded one direction 17 miles. The ash plume circled the earth then returned, according to the Ranger talk. In 1982 then President Reagan specified a certain area near the mountain to be left as is and let nature recover without any human intervention. There is a research study area designated. Outside the study area is where the forest service removed trees and replanted in a “managed forest” way and removed downed trees so they would not contribute to a huge forest fire if a lightning strike started one in the area. Sounds right to me since the Northern part of WA is having huge forest fires as I write.

Mt. St. Helens

Mt. St. Helens

Spirit Lake rose 200 ft. due to glacier melting.

Spirit Lake rose 200 ft. due to glacier melting.

Reforestation at age 30.

Reforestation at age 30.


Forest flower

Forest flower


forest flower

forest flower

Advertisements

Success in 2012 – Garden in review

2012 brought lots of changes to my Western Washington garden. It was my first full growing season in this new place. Most of the plants were successful, but a few heat loving veggies such as basil and cucumbers are not very well suited to this climate. This was my first time doing a vegetable garden since 1999, in Minnesota, the year I turned the veggie garden into a rose bed and arbor. The gardening year can be summed up by the sign below. (I found it on Pinterest, but do not have any more source info.)

20121222-212949.jpg
Western Washington is a great place to garden. There is plentiful moisture 9 months of the year and the ground here in my garden near the Sound never really freezes. The down side of that is weeds never really stop germinating and growing. OK, maybe they do slow down in December and January, but only because of low light levels.

Plans for a new garden

I am always planning. It’s the optimist in me. There are several areas that need a plan for next season. They say the rainy season will begin on Friday so I have been crazy busy as a mad woman pulling plants out and amending the soil to be ready to move some roses into a new area. The Mantis tiller would not start for me as the daylight hours slip away. Frustrating!!! Tomorrow is the last expected dry day. And daylight is so short.

20121010-175350.jpg

One rose, many colors

Phototropism is directional growth in which the direction of growth is determined by the direction of the light source. In other words, it is the growth and response to a light stimulus. (Wikipedia) ‘Rainbow’s End’ miniature rose has an interesting response to sun and lack of sun. It is registered as a yellow blend rose and as you can see in the photo, it starts out yellow with a red edge and finishes as a solid red rose in this photo taken May 28th in a location where it gets PM sun.

Image

Rainbow’s End miniature rose has an interesting color change depending on the light.

Image

The same plant has a solid red finishing color.

Image

Rainbow’s End photographed in greenhouse in October.

Now look at the photo above which was taken in my greenhouse last fall. It is the same potted plant with it’s last bloom of the season grown under the low light conditions of fall in the Pacific Northwest. Fun to observe if you are a plant geek as I am.