Exploring the world of Fuchsias

I tend to read a lot of gardening books during the (North American) Winter because my library has a good selection checked in šŸ™‚ Does anyone else do this? Right now I am fascinated with Fuchsias and found a really straight forward book written for a beginner to the topic.

 

 

Dorling Kindersley Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2000

Dorling Kindersley Publishing, Inc. Copyright 2000


I have acquired a few of these plants with a long flowering period and have been focusing on those hardy in my zone 8 garden.
Fuchsia flower types

Fuchsia flower types


According to this book they are easy to propagate so that may be one of my winter greenhouse activities.
Plant propagation.

Plant propagation.

Greenhouse blooms to make you smile :)

It’s nice to be able to see garden blooms in late November. Anybody can go to the flower market and buy seasonal blooms, but growing flowers has always been more appealing to me. I want to learn more about varieties I can grow in a cool greenhouse and enjoy over the winter. Do you have any suggestions or experience with this?

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Late Bloomers During a Welcome Dry Spell

The weather here in the Pacific Northwest USA never ceases to amaze me. Statistically, November is the rainiest month but we are currently in a very welcome dry period. Dry but rather cold at night (26* F so far in my garden.) I am amazed at the plants that are still healthy and blooming!
Camelias naturally bloom at this time of year, but it is still fun to share. Recently I moved the tiny chrysanthemum into the greenhouse. I thought Bacopa was an annual but it is still hanging on. The hardy fuchsias are the stars. I have only known the annual fuchsias in my previous gardens.

Fresh air, sun breaks and slug patrol

“Rain shadow of the Olympic Mountains” is what is happening today in my weather, so I just could not stay indoors. Yes, even the raised beds are muddy. I went through two pairs of “waterproof” mud gloves before I realized it is just too cool to be enjoyable any longer. But I get a few photos of things growing other than weeds.

Lacino "Dinosaur" kale

Flamingo “Flamingo kale

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Lettuce and chard planted Sept 20.

Lettuce and chard planted Sept 20.

There is a chill in the air

Like it or not, it’s time here. The Hood Canal area of the peninsula had a freeze last night. I think my area near Puget Sound got down to 34* or 36*F. Today I started loading my unheated greenhouse with tender plants I want to save. During the past two years The lowest low in January was 26*F on one or two overnights. Plants inside have been safe. I hope we have another of those average winters ahead.
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Using what you grow

I’m almost starting to feel like a food blogger, but just realized that the last part of being a veggie gardener is the harvest šŸ™‚ My butternut squash plants were purchased from the garden club plant sale. Thanks Mary Ann! The little $1.00 plant has given me 8 good-sized squash. Some will be stored for later use, but I am roasting one today. Simple, recipe with my comments below.

400* F oven roast for 30 to 45 minutes turning cubes every 15 minutes

1 butternut squash, cut in half, seeded and peeled and cut in one inch cubes. The potato peeler worked well, being only slightly more difficult than peeling a potato.

I put the cubes in a bowl sprinkled on some olive oil, salt and pepper and massaged the squash before putting it on the foil lined tray.

You can see that I got tired of peeling and chopping when I got to the bowl part of the squash so I massaged open squash with olive oil and the sprinkled a bit of cinnamon for a different taste.

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What did you do with your harvested squash?